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Vet Successfully Sews One Stitch in Teeny Tree Frog Whose Lung Was Exposed, Loving ‘all Creatures Great and Small’


Meaghan barrow

In the bitcoin community, there is a phrase that says someone has “diamond hands”, which means that they will never lower the price by selling. Well that’s nothing compared to the hands of an Australian vet who performed surgery on a fingertip-sized tree frog.

Brought in by accident in some of the eucalyptus trees intended to feed koalas at the RSPCA facility in Wacol, Brisbane, the little green tree frog was not doing so well when it was caught by wildlife vet Meaghan Barrow.

Meaghan barrow

“[A colleague] He took it to the clinic and she was really worried, she said ‘it seems to have a lump on one side of the body,’ “he said. ABC News Australia.

“I looked at it closely and it actually had a small hole, it was only a couple of millimeters long, but in a little frog only two centimeters long, that’s a pretty big hole inside its chest.”

Some of the frog’s internal organs were poking out of the hole, so the treatment plan was pretty straightforward – the frog needed a suture. And so, administering anesthesia diluted to one-thousandth of a dose to compensate for its diminutive size, Barrow got down to business.

MORE: Scientists Discover a New Brown Species They Called the ‘Chocolate Frog,’ and It’s Adorable

That wasn’t the end of the trade-off, as all the surgical tools, the needle and the suture material, had to be tiny.

Meaghan barrow

Also, the normal application of pressure that Barrow could apply when giving points to larger animals might not work with the frog due to how thin the amphibian skin is. Amphibians, like frogs, sometimes draw oxygen through their skin, making it very delicate.

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To stabilize his diamond hands, Barrow successfully applied a single soluble suture and declared the operation a success.

In fact, the frog was happily hopping again the next day, and even regained its bright green color, although that may have been the result of painkillers, again diluted to one-thousandth.

“You learn to treat so many different animals that you have to adapt and test the skills that you would apply to a dog or a cat, to any species,” Barrow said, noting that he had operated on tiny frogs before. and that he was happy to help the little one.

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